Category Archives: Crime

Where will our library go?

Thorney Library

Thorney looks likely to lose its current library in January when the building is put up for auction.

Thorney Parish Council heard on Monday evening that Peterborough City Council is hoping to sell the building, along with the former community centre in Church Street, for £300,000.

Both the old community centre and the library were the village’s infants’ and girls’ schools until 1940, when the Duke of Bedford School opened.

Parish councillor Russ Bevington, responding to a question from Doris Pacey, a member of the public, said the village would not lose its library, but he couldn’t say whether there would be a break in service or what the new provision would be.

He said there had been talk of a mobile library or putting up a temporary building next to the Bedford Hall.

The future of the library seems tied up with the future of the Bedford Hall, the village community centre. There is a proposal to house the library in space at the back of the hall, but cost was estimated at £110,000.

A suggestion to accommodate it at the school was rejected by school governors.

Mr Bevington said the city council had promised the money from the sale of the Church Street premises would stay in the village and that some of it would be used to help fund a new pavilion in the park.

Anti-social behaviour problems

Residents of Park Close attended the meeting to complain about anti-social behaviour that was making their lives a misery.

It was claimed there had been fights, threats against other residents, drinking and drug taking. There had been three police raids, including one by armed police.

City councillors agreed to take up the issues with Cross Keys Housing Association to see if something could be done.

Parish Council chairman, John Bartlett, said the problems stemmed from when Peterborough City Council changed its letting policy, which resulted in families being housed in properties that were intended as old people’s bungalows.

Council vacancy

There have been two applications for the vacancy on Thorney Parish Council. Councillors will interview candidates at next month’s meeting.

Heritage street signs

The “heritage” streets signs for Church Street and Abbey Place are due to be delivered this week and should be installed soon.

LED street lights

Installation of LED street lights in the village is almost complete. A number of old lights with concrete lamp-posts remain to be converted and the heritage street lights for Church Street and Abbey Place have not been installed.

The parish council had been concerned about the cost of these rising from £10,000 to £20,000 and had still not received an explanation from Peterborough City Council.

£300 for Tommies

The Parish Council is to pay £300 towards the cost of the Tommy silhouettes that were used for the commemoration of the centenary of the end of the First World War.

Village signs are rotten

It might cost up to £15,000 to replace Thorney’s four village signs, which are now rotten.

The quote was for replica signs in aluminium, which would have a lifespan of up to 25 years. The Parish Council thought this was too much and are seeking quotes from other companies.

Nathan Potts said he’d had quotes from a local craftsman who could carve the signs in oak at a cost of £11,000.

It was suggested the current signs would need to be changed as the abbey was much too short and squat. New signs should get the scale right. Another suggestion was for a silhouette design, which might be substantially cheaper.

A decision was deferred until December to get more quotes.

Police warning after “distraction burglary”

neighbourhood-watch-logo

A so-called distraction burglary took place in Ash Close yesterday at 11.45am.

Two men knocked on the door to offer some gardening work and the elderly resident was distracted by one of the males while the other entered the house and stole an amount of money.

The two men left quickly in a Peugeot 206 car van and the vehicle was later located by officers several miles away. Police say forensic work is still ongoing.
The men were described by a witness as being ‘middle aged’ and possibly wearing checked shirts.  The van was seen leaving the street at speed at 11.56am.
Cambridgeshire Police say: “Please warn older neighbours, family members and friends NOT to buy any services on the doorstep.  The best advice is not to open your door to anyone you are not expecting or do not know.  If in doubt, keep them out.  It’s also a good idea to keep your front and back doors locked even whilst you are at home.”
Anyone with any information regarding the burglary in Ash Close should call 101 quoting crime reference 35/17494/18.

No leads on cemetery vandalism

Cemetry

Police have drawn a blank with their investigation into vandalism at Thorney Cemetery.

A spokesman said that despite publicity in local media and an appeal on Crimestoppers, no information was forthcoming and there are no further lines on inquiry to pursue.

A spokesman said: “The offence occurred on Halloween and was likely to be prompted by this annual event. There have not been further instances however, in the interim, there will be continuing patrols checking the cemetery.”

Neighbourhood Watch scheme for village?

NHW-Roundel-1

A village-wide Neighbourhood Watch scheme is being proposed following a number of burglaries and incidences of vandalism in Thorney.

The woman behind the plan is Parish Councillor Samantha Godley. She suggested the idea on the Thorney’s Facebook forum and now wants to see if the village is behind it.

Samantha plans to hold a public meeting in January where people will be able to find out more.

“The idea came about following the vandalism in the cemetery, along with recent burglary attempts in the area,” she explained. “Quite a few people showed interest in the scheme, so I wanted to try and catch those in the village who perhaps haven’t seen the Facebook post or don’t use Facebook.”

Neighbourhood Watch involves members working together, alongside the Police, sharing concerns and observations, reducing crime and fear of crime and looking out for each other.

“Our scheme would cover the village and those living on the droves, if they wished to join. It would include homes, businesses and our park and cemeteries,” said Samantha

Some of the benefits are:

  • Members looking out for each other, even when they are away.
  • More awareness about local crime – with updates as and when they come through.
  • Feeling safer in your neighbourhood.
  • Potentially discounted home insurance, maybe 5-10%.
  • Access to further low-price crime prevention items, such as purse bells.
  • Feeling less isolated (possibly more so for those living on the outskirts of the village).
  • Older residents may feel re-assured and comforted knowing people are willing to help them if they need it.
  • New residents and families may feel re-assured, knowing that people are looking out for them.
  • Academic Research has shown that Neighbourhood Watch Schemes can reduce crime.

Sam says although signage in Neighbourhood Watch areas is recommended as a deterrent, it is not essential. Those who join could display a window sticker instead which can also be a deterrent.

Joining the scheme is free.

“I am planning a meeting in January for those who are interested to find out more.  One of the Peterborough Neighbourhood Watch Representatives will be there to answer questions.”

Samantha says she will put posters up and advertise the meeting in the Thorney Post Community Forum Facebook page when she has a date and time confirmed.  In the meantime, people can contact her either by email samgodley@hotmail.co.uk or 07572 876311.